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Topic: TIGER RAID - What did you think?!! | Reactions & Poll | SPOILERS WARNING!

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TIGER RAID - what did YOU think? [9 vote(s)]

***** 5 Stars - EXCELLENT!
77.8%
**** 4 Stars - Good
11.1%
*** 3 Stars - It was OK
11.1%
** 2 Stars - a bit disapponting
0.0%
* 1 Star - not for me
0.0%
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tigerraid28.png 

TIGER RAID IS RELEASED TODAY IN THE UK!

weapon

We've read the reviews and watched from the sidelines..

now it's our turn!

HAVE YOU SEEN IT ?

What did you think?

VOTE in the POLL above

and

COMMENT below!

action

 

Warning: 

THERE WILL BE SPOILERS!!!!! 

movietape



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After many months (years?) of eager anticipation, I have finally seen 'Tiger Raid'!

 

trgif4b_zps1x8so0l2.gif

 

And I seem to have forgotten how to breathe! Processing time is needed, but initial reaction is being swamped with feelings - everything we've read about the film is true, it's full on intense, immersive..it's definitely more of a thriller than an action movie and could even be described as a psychological thriller. It's a roller coaster ride from beginning to end, full of tension and twists. There is full on violence but to be honest from what we had read there was far less gore than I thought there might be. There was one scene I had to turn away though..

It's an extreme experience, breath holding, visceral, all consuming, but more because of the performances of Damien and Brian Gleeson, as Paddy and Joe, who engage in this dangerous, relentless, psychological dance throughout. Their performances are both vivid and subtle, and they both embody their characters utterly and completely. 

What I wasn't expecting was for it to be so moving... the emotion, for me, was on so many levels, on the characters' histories, how damaged they are.. this part surprised me. I was moved from the outset. I wasn't sure if that was because it was so emotionally powerful to be seeing the film after all this time.. or the soul of the film--or the powerfully sublime soundtrack. I suspect all of these.

There was some dark humour as well.. the moment that made me laugh the most though was a reference to a vampire and Damien's face after!

I want to say something too about the beauty of the film.. it is dark, disturbing yes.. yet there is also something very profound about it.. There is a pureness to the rawness... the closeup intimacy of the drama between these dark souls..set against this vast unending backdrop.. on the edge of life (and on the edge of their lives) it was almost like the final judgement... there was a moment, as the sun rose, when the soundtrack had that kind of feel to it, not apocalyptic, not other worldly, but almost like approaching the gates of purgatory-- or a world between life and death. (Maybe this is just nuts and I need to watch it again but I am saying it before I change my mind and convince myself otherwise) The soundtrack very much had this feel for me too. 

I've read a few times that you can see the ending coming, but I was playing out various versions in my head.. the final version seemed inevitable after the event but not predictable. There is a pain in my heart still. Not because of the outcome, but because of the journey, the revelations, the sadness.. for them all.

 

edit an hour on: The film oozes creative integrity from edge to edge. It's beautifully made and stunningly shot. The soundtrack is exquisitely sublime. Part of the film's power is down to this synergy and the care in every heartbeat of the film from performance to production.

It's kind of unnameable, but there is something transcendent.. and for something so dark, the word that remains for me, still, is beautiful.

It is a brave film, I feel huge admiration for everyone involved and hope they feel deservedly proud of it.

Edit:  Paddy and Joe's end seemed inevitable... and though there was still that thread of hope of redemption for all of them.. like I said, the whole film felt like they were in purgatory... waiting for their final judgement. This became increasingly obvious as unavoidable.  But there was a surprise element to how it was going to happen. I was actually glad it was Shadha who did it.. and that she walked free. What was more upsetting was that there was no hope for these dark and damaged souls.

 



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Molonian
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Domino, you've said it all! Terrific review, I really can't add to it!

A friend of mine saw 'Radio Luxembourg' in Galway and raved about it. One of the things she said was that her 'take' on the two main characters morphed throughout, she had a constantly changing viewpoint of who was good and who was bad. I'm glad that this nuance was still seen in the film.

It was over before it had started - I couldn't believe that 90 minutes had passed so quickly.

It wasn't as gory and bloody as I expected, it was more psychological than actual. The language was awful, but then I couldnt see Joe and Paddy drinking tea with a pinkie stuck out.

Everyone gave tremendous performances, completely different from anything we've seen them in before. The characters of Joe and Paddy had tremendous depth to them. It is such a shame it won't be seen on the large screen - it really deserve that.

The soundtrack and scenery (actual and set) were amazing. Considering the short shooting time for the film, the camera crew must have been working nonstop to get some of the views, truly beautiful.

I've given five stars - to be honest, it would have been five stars even if Damien wasn't in it.

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Well said Ellie, agree with all you have expressed here! That nuanced dynamic - the constantly shifting sands between Paddy and Joe (no pun intended) - was captivating .. and really really worked as a film for me.

5 stars from me too and exactly as you say, not just because of Damien!

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Anyone else had the chance to see TR yet? come and join the discussion!

Anyone who has seen it yesterday wake up thinking about it today?

Joe and Paddy and both very layered characters..

Both are very dark souls and killers who have normalized their way of life. But who ultimately is the biggest monster? Can we sympathise with either of them , at all?
Paddy at first appears the less messed up of the two almost trying to contain volatile Joe like a ticking bomb in case he explodes. That dynamic creates the escalating tension . But Joe and his ever changing versions of truth,bubble easily to the surface, are all on display, (completely, eventually) whereas Paddy's darkness is less surface visible, and creeps in more slowly, only becoming apparent when Shadha reveals more about their relationship. it is more obvious earlier on that Joe has been so damaged his version of reality do distorted that he is beyond hope. His final revelation (Marilyn / Ruby) is so utterly tragic and perhaps the more tragic love story of the film.. but does Paddy carry the bigger delusion about his past and possible furure with Shadha? His secrets are perhaps the more disturbing as they begin to sink in...


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Molonian
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Spoiler alert!

It is Paddy's true sadism that is roiling over in my mind, domino. He thinks only of himself, his own feelings in regard to Shadha - his version of 'love' is truly frightening. Poor girl, what would her life have become if things had worked out in Paddy's favour? As it is she is left totally alone in a (not very nice) world, her only comfort being release from a monster.

Joe could have been such a different person - he has kept his daughter away from his life but I'm not too sure about his son. His sexuality must have been difficult for him to accept.

The casual violence displayed by both men while discussing the 'higher' things in life - love, politics, religion - was amazing. "Professional standards" has just been given a whole new meaning.

A day later and I still can't help thinking about Tiger Raid - the sign of a really good film!

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Spoiler alert! Spoiler alert! Spoiler alert!
(there is a spoiler alert in the topic title, but just to re affirm - there will be film spoilers in this topic!!!)

Ellie, thank you for continuing to talk about TR, I've woken up today with the film still on my mind and the need to discuss!

Agree about Paddy and Shadha..and Paddy's darkness was far more insidious than Joe's...which is why it was, morals aside, exactly the right ending... there were so many possible variables that could have happened.. but my feelings would be very different if ....

I actually felt some hope and triumph for Shadha... that final scene as she walked away, leaving that messy darkness behind her physically, with the soundtrack, and sunset (was it sunset? hard to tell how much time had passed since the sunrise at the beginning) still a bleakness.. but she'd reclaimed her power..

And...wasn't Sofia Boutella incredible as Shadha? Total admiration for her performance.



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We've not really mentioned it yet, but Tiger Raid is also really funny. All things considered, this is pretty amazing considering the really disturbing themes. But there is even humour in the darkest goriest scene! Such a rollercoaster! And the Gandhi scene! LOL! Brian Gleeson made Joe so multidimensional! 



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WOOHOO!

Molonians!

Has anyone else seen Tiger Raid yet?

Come and vote in the poll and share your reactions!

 

Also......

 

Please rate Tiger Raid on

imdb

iTunes

rotten tomatoes

Google Play

and everywhere else you can---this really does make a difference!



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Well, that was a bit of a head f*ck, wasn't it?!  

Just finished and read over the comments here. Too much going through my head right now, but I basically agree with everything already said. I had read the review/synopsis of the play, but it's been so long that I'd forgotten that the sympathies of the characters swap. It was a really subtle thing, after so long listening to Joe's crazy prattle, the revelation of Paddy's dark side. Joe is clearly unhinged, he makes no excuses and is under no illusions that he is anything other than an irredeemable killer, lost to the violence.  Paddy is the sane voice of reason for so much of their exchange, he easily could have become the hero of the story. The revelation of his darkness, of his delusion, crept out in finely woven threads.   I can say that I did not see that ending coming; the gasp out loud moment for me was when Shadha pulled the trigger. Perhaps I was naive or too immersed in the story unfolding, but it didn't feel predictable nor inevitable to me, though I agree domino it felt right. Neither man was going to let her go.  

Superb performances, haunting cinematography.  The soundtrack to me embodies the dichotomy of the world of the story, reflecting the haunting isolated expanses and the stifling intimacy between the characters.  The intensity of the sound punctuates the violence that's masked as banter the quiet moments provide a strong undertone for the actual violence. The whole of it has the feel of an existential crisis. Which probably makes to sense to anyone, but it's what pops in my head when I think of all the crazy back n forth between Joe and Paddy that spirals down to the end.

I may not be making sense anymore.  My excuse is it's 1am.

 



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1 am --> dawn is the perfect time to be talking about this particular film whimsy

 

So glad you've seen it - thank you for sharing your thoughts, very well said. I've been trying to write a review since Monday which is turning into more of a dissertation, but you've nailed it in two paragraphs

Agree with you about Paddy, hero is not a word I'd have chosen for his potential because he was still a violent killer, but within the messed up world they operated in, he certainly at first appeared to have more of a moral code, even a conscience in contrast to Joe. His more insiduous darkness is what still remains 5 days on after watching the film. I found the ending completely unpredictable too, but as the raid unfolded, it seemed inevitable to me that neither man would walk away from it.

There was also this sense for me of them entering through the gates of hell, (they were damned from the moment they killed the gate keepers) or some place between life and death..there was no way out...and this was their final judgement, overseen by omnipotent Dave  (the devil?) where they were presented with ghosts from their pasts and their demons were revealed. In the end they were the captives. 



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Here's my still too long attempt at a Tiger Raid review! 

TIGER RAID Review: Head spanglingly immersive, pitch black but beautiful and hauntingly profound

 

 

 

© Dixon Baxi Evans

© Dixon Baxi Evans


Fair warning: this review contains spoilers!

 

It has been two years since news reached us of Damien appearing in a film shot in the Jordanian desert.

We’ve excitedly waited on the sidelines as the movie premiered at film festivals across the world, enjoyed promos, trailers, sneak peeks and treats.

After months of eager anticipation, Tiger Raid has at last been unleashed in the UK. To say there were expectations would be an understatement.

But no words, no amount of anything, could prepare for watching the film – an extreme, immersive, breath holding, visceral, all-consuming experience, that is so much greater than the description, or sum, of its phenomenal parts.

Damien and Brian Gleeson star as Paddy and Joe, two mercenaries on a mission to carry out the kidnapping part of a ‘Tiger Raid’. We meet them en route, riding a jeep across the desert night, wearing painted on bandit-like black masks. The pair are working together for the first time and begin the job with mutual distrust. Teasing and testing each other, they immediately engage in a dangerous, relentless, psychological dance.

© Dixon Baxi Evans

© Dixon Baxi Evans

Set in the war-torn Middle East, against a vast and empty backdrop, the film’s opening has an almost apocalyptic feel, and as they begin to converse, the words of the two men could be as a result of some ‘new world order’. But the action is not set in the future, this is now, and the context Paddy and Joe exist within, overseen by an invisible boss ‘Dave’, has its own rules. But they each have their own versions of reality within that world, and as they collide and constantly challenge each other, a sparking kinetic energy continuously grows between them. It’s an increasingly chaotic and ‘volatile situation’, an intense and suspenseful roller coaster.

© Dixon Baxi Evans

© Dixon Baxi Evans

Both highly skilled pros, their dehumanised, terminator-like swift and efficient killing expertise is quickly established when they arrive at a checkpoint and gun down every man on sight. Enjoying it like a sport, sharing an unspoken understanding, the power struggle between the two men is less a professional one (their competence is not in question) than a testing of their values within a violent, dark and deadly world.

© Dixon Baxi Evans

© Dixon Baxi Evans

 

Joe is fierce, troubled, and frighteningly unpredictable. Working for Dave for longer than Paddy and self sacrificingly loyal, he tries to assert his seniority and experience over the younger man. Pushing and testing Paddy’s boundaries, bragging about killings and torture, joking about rape, Joe is not just offensive, he is a monster. Declaring he also killed his former working partner Ruby, he holds it over Paddy like a threat. But his story keeps changing, and as he presents different versions of the truth, while haunted with flashbacks and visions of a former lover Marylyn, it soon becomes clear just how unhinged he is. But Joe is also the source of most of the film’s dark humour and is strangely and uncomfortably almost likeable. Despite his deceptions there is something honest about him too, “a clown with a gun.”

© Dixon Baxi Evans

© Dixon Baxi Evans

Paddy is cocksure, highly ambitious, “I think I’ve a lot of contemporary ideas to offer”, and convinced of his invincibility, “I’m superman”. Charming and goading, he meets every challenge Joe throws his way and counters his displays of greater experience by mocking the older man’s blind faith in Dave.

At first Paddy appears to be the more stable of the two, with one foot in the sanity camp and more of a moral code, even a conscience, not going along with Joe’s most offensive jokes. He even appears romantic and love struck when he talks about an ex lover; “She was beautiful. She was perfect. Like proof God exists.” In the psychological game of chess between the two men, Paddy at times refuses to play and his version of reality within this crazy world seems less distorted than Joe’s.

They are both in fact pawns for Dave, the omnipotent but never seen or heard (by us) man with the masterplan, who intermittently makes radio contact to change up the rules as he likes, playing with the men as his own toys in his own game.

Before the kidnapping takes place, Paddy receives orders from Dave via his ear piece to kill Joe at the end of the job. As the raid progresses Dave’s machinations cause more twists and turns, and create more layers of secrecy between the two men, adding to the already menacing undercurrent.

© Dixon Baxi Evans;

© Dixon Baxi Evans

Finally arriving at a palatial location, the home of their kidnappee Shadha (Sofia Boutella), daughter of a powerful and very rich businessman, the pair spring into action, quickly dispatching a guard. With Joe insisting upon “professional standards” while chopping up the body with an axe (off screen), the dark humour is both difficult to watch but impossible to look away from, in the most suggestively gory and irresistibly funny scene of the film.

Shadha is captured with ease and slick professionalism, gagged, tied to a chair and beaten by Joe. She is not only the victim of the operation, but also becomes another piece on the board in the increasingly sickening game between the two men.

© Dixon Baxi Evans;

© Dixon Baxi Evans

After Paddy and Joe discover her true identity as the woman Paddy had earlier divulged was his one true love, a series of revelations unfold. The scales begin to tip from a volatile to direful situation and the tension ratchets up even higher as the two men begin to turn on each other.

Joe begins to unravel, just how lost he is, the extent of his obedience to a faceless authority, and his own captivity to the code of his own distorted paradigm, all becoming clear when his truth is eventually uncovered – Marylyn was in fact Ruby, who he loved but believed he had to kill. His repression and the price he has paid personally makes him more tragic, even vulnerable.

Where Joe’s confession brings a glimmer of hope for redemption, it is not so for Paddy, who, Shadha reveals, has a hidden sadistic nature. As she utters the words, defiant in the face of her captors, the realisation of the depths of Paddy’s delusion, and an awareness of his true darkness, begins to creep insidiously in – his earlier apparent morality a facade, and his self deception sociopathic. 

© Dixon Baxi Evans

© Dixon Baxi Evans

Their black painted eyes become symbolic, not only of how the two men look out at the world, but also of the masks they hide their truths behind (even to themselves.) As the makeup is slowly removed, in Paddy’s case almost completely as Joe nearly drowns him in a water trough, both men are exposed.

These last twists result not only in almost a switch of sympathies for Paddy and Joe, but also a growing sense of inevitability that neither could walk away from this.

Throughout the film the close-up intimacy of the drama between these dark souls takimg place against an empty, unending background, gives the feeling of them being on the edge of life (and on the edge of their lives). Where in the beginning the checkpoint appears as the entrance into a world between life and death, like the gates of purgatory (where they killed the gate keepers), in the end scenes, presented with ghosts from their pasts and with their demons revealed, Joe and Paddy approach their final judgement. There becomes a sense that both were damned from the start, with no way back.

Doubly trapped, by the ties that bind her and Paddy's scarily warped vision of their love, Shadha is defiant in the face of her captivity. Cutting through Paddy's domineering delusional fantasy, "fuck love", she reclaims her power, ending it in perhaps the only way it can be ended.

The final shocking events (and in Paddy's case, also sudden) are not predictable, but within the context and warped moral code of their world, it could be said that both Joe and Paddy meet the perfect punishment. Perhaps Shadha is proof, after all, that God exists.

© Dixon Baxi Evans;

© Dixon Baxi Evans

It might be tempting to assume that the film’s climax is the only moving part, but this is not the case. Despite being undeniably dark and very disturbing, there is also something overwhelmingly profound and beautiful, emotionally powerful and pure about it from the outset. The hauntingly penetrating score and the photography, delivering sweeping panoramas, and close-ups, magnifying and contextualising the characters’ inner and outer worlds, heighten the beauty that both transcends and permeates the whole journey. There is a moment at the beginning when the sun rises over the desert and the score is potently sublime, other worldly, almost celestial, echoed in the very final scene as Shadha steps out free from captivity into the light. These are not religious themes but they speak to the deeper, even poetic, soul of the film.

The performances are both vivid and subtle, all three actors embody their characters utterly and completely. Damien and Brian Gleeson imbue Paddy and Joe with vibrant and shifting shades, evoking emotion for these characters, in places where you shouldn’t find yourself moved at all. But their journey, their revelations, their damaged, hidden hinterlands and histories, lay heavily, even painfully, in the heart.

Adapted from Mick Donnellan’s play Radio Luxembourg, the tonal and tense, multi-layered, intelligently constructed story translates to the screen seamlessly, the largely two person plot ceaselessly compelling and absorbing. The story and character arcs are so richly textured, they are almost impossible to entirely compute in one viewing. The film’s essence remains and its meaning continues to unfold long after it is over.

An up close uncategorisable character piece with strains of psychological thriller, this intimate yet immense film oozes quality and creative integrity from edge to edge. It’s incredibly performed, beautifully made by first time director Simon Dixon, stunningly shot by Si Bell, and Dean Valentine’s deliciously permeating score is both impactfully pulsating and exquisitely sublime. Part of the film’s power is down to this synergy and the care in every heartbeat of the film from performance to production.

Very much an Indie and with nothing manufactured, mainstream or mass produced about it, this is far from easy, end of the day, escapism. But it is an alive, artistic, affecting experience. And It deserves to be experienced.

To repeat an earlier sentiment, no words could explain Tiger Raid because they will not be enough to convey the experience of it. However tempting it might be to try to reference it to another film, there really is no film quite like it.

Head spanglingly immersive, pitch black but beautiful, hauntingly profound, moving, brave and indelible, Tiger Raid is so worth the wait and more than worth the watch.

So watch it – November Oscar Whisky f***ing NOW.

DMF rating: ★★★★★

 

Tiger Raid is available in the UK on VOD platforms and on DVD now.

 

Have you seen Damien in Tiger Raid? Vote in the poll and join the conversation with other fans at the forum, here!

 

 


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Damiac
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It was nice to see Damien in a film. The acting was great and the cinematography and soundtrack were good, but it was a truly messed up story.  

Fuck love for sure. 



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We've been waiting to see this film for such a long time I think it's fair to say that expectations were pretty high.  but it totally didn't disappoint!  I must confess that when I first watched this on Monday afternoon I did briefly lose concentration at one point about 2 thirds of the way through.  But considering I was nursing an injury which I later discovered was a broken wrist I think it's very much to the film's credit that I was completely mesmerised by most of it!

I agree entirely with all the other comments.  Joe was obviously pretty crazed from the start....but the slow revelation of Paddy's dark depths was superbly done.  I was totally on the edge of my seat expecting something gruesome to happen - despite the fact that they'd said the violence was implied - so my immediate impression was that it wasn't as disturbing as I'd thought it might be.  The scene where Jo hacked up the body - which could've been quite horrific - was actually quite cartoonish in a way......  I'm not sure why, but I was expecting Paddy to end up dead....like it was something I already knew was going to happen.  But I wasn't expecting it to be by Shadha's hand.  The effect being - for me at least - that it was somehow the most violent act in the whole film.  I'm not sure that I agree that it felt right....

It was the right ending for Joe.  I wonder how he was before he dispatched Ruby - was he much like Paddy?  Was that what tipped him over the edge?  Or was he already that crazed?  Taking his own life was the only way out for him.....and was a sort of redemption (the suicide vest has quite significant connotations...)  Paddy had no such insight into his own depravity....and his 'execution' offered no sense of absolution for him.  But however satisfying it may appear, I'm not entirely convinced it was the right ending for Shadha.  She has released herself.....she is no longer a victim.... But at what cost?

It's definitely a psychological thriller rather than an action film.  And as such the depths of it become more disturbing after the film has ended than while you're watching it.  It really is about 'the dark hearts of men'.  And I think it will reveal more layers on each viewing for some time to come.

The cinematography was stunning and the souundtrack haunting.....and it made me so wish that I'd been able to see this at a cinema hmm

Ive got so much more to say....but that'll have to do for now!

 

 



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DMF
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The same for me fifi, less horrific than I expected, but a week on I still feel subliminally disturbed - the layers continue to unravel after watching too.

For me it felt right in terms of - if it had to happen, that is how it should happen. Not right in any moral sense, or in line with any of my beliefs, at all, or in terms of the lingering hope of redemption for Paddy however messed up he is. Within the context of their world and the world of their film. Not sure I'm saying this right but then, it has been a striving for words since seeing his film, so hard to convey feeling, fully.



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DMF
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So, who is up for Tiger Raid chat party this Tuesday night? About 8.15pm UK time?

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Molonian
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Count me in!

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DMF
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Excellent Ellie, I am looking forward to a proper chat about this film!

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Marvellous Molonian Moderator
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I've finally watched Tiger Raid and read everyone's comments.

We've been waiting for this film for so long, it hardly seems real! I think this film is going to take a long time to sink in. I think it was whimsy who described it as a headf*** and that was my overriding feeling. Not only were Paddy and Joe playing dark, disturbing mind games with each other, the audience are having their minds f***ed with too. It's never clear whether it's Paddy or Joe who is being tested, or even if there is a 'test' at all.

Strangely the language and violence didn't bother me that much, it was the heart pounding sense of tension and danger that affected me. Both men were so unpredictable and likely to erupt into violence at any moment. It was never clear if Paddy and Joe were partners or enemies and the balance of power between them swung from minute to minute.

It was dark, disturbing, haunting, emotive and powerful. It was fascinating to see Damien in a role where his character seemed to have nothing likeable or redeeming about him. It is such a shame that this won't be seen in cinemas. The cinematography was stunning and would have benefited being seen on the big screen. The landscape added to the sense of alienation that Paddy and Joe feel from 'normal' society. The soundtrack was haunting and perfectly captured the strange beauty of this film. The music reminded me a little of Bladerunner in a strange way.

I'm sure I'll have more to say once this experience has sunk in! Looking forward to discussing with everyone tomorrow.

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DMF
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So glad you've seen TR Rosie - thanks for sharing your thoughts, agree with pretty much all you've said. 'strange beauty' - yes!

Interesting reference to Bladerunner - one of my fave films. Not sure I see the connection but will consider again!

Glad you're coming to the chat tomorrow too

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Rosie, I had two films the music and atmosphere reminded me of and one of them is Bladerunner!  How interesting we had the same impression! I think for me the music of Bladerunner is haunting, with a dissonant longing quality to it. The music of Tiger Raid echoes that feel. The other is Until the End of the World with William Hurt, which the second half is located in the Australian outback. It's an odd movie, very fast pace at first then very slow, there's a built up and drawn out expectancy.  That's how Tiger Raid felt. Not slow per say, but the expection of action, the expectation of some resolution, is drawn out. I don't mean that as a criticism, it was very well done to keep you at the edge of your seat in heightened awareness, second guessing your perception of the continually shifting and degrading character of the two men. 

Btw, the music is the only thing I liked about Bladerunner.  

Completely agree that the cinematography deserved that big screen.  I fortunately have a fairly large one, so really did feel immersed in the landscape.  Still not sure about the "test".  My first impression is that Paddy WAS being tested, the boss would have known exactly who it was he'd been in a relationship with.  The suicide jacket seemed like revenge.  As Paddy said, it was excessive when he could have just shot him and been done with it. Paddy asking all those questions about Marylin (was that what he called Ruby?) felt like leading questions, rather than idle chit chat or actual interest.  Paddy's mission was to get Joe to break down and want to commit suicide.  But I feel I need to watch the movie again to get into deeper meanings.

I don't know if I'll be able to make the chat.  Have alot going on with the house and the upcoming trip.  But I will try.  





-- Edited by whimsyfox on Tuesday 25th of October 2016 01:39:28 AM

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Domino, that review is just beautiful!



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A lilt in his voice.  Every sentence like music...
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Thank you whimsy!

I've watched TR four times now and... OMG this film is so good. You'd think the impact would lessen with repeated exposure but it doesn't. Every time I've cried and laughed my way through it. Perhaps with more laughter as the disturbing elements become less of a surprise? There are so many funny lines, mostly from Joe.. so intertwined with the darkness and tragedy.

"Overheads"

"Professional standards"

"jesus how could anyone f*** a soclal worker"

"I met Gandhi"

"and I had to buy Gandhi a new rug"

"heart attacks are for amateurs"

 

I can confirm that for me the emotion was not just because of seeing the film for the fist time after waiting so long.. And the tears begin as soon as the soundtrack casts its evocative spell as the film opens against the blue bathed backdrop. And that scene with the sunrise? I nearly sob. Every time.

Just me?



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How funny you thought of Blade Runner too, whimsy! It's definitely the haunting quality of the music that reminded me of it.

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whimsyfox wrote:

Rosie, I had two films the music and atmosphere reminded me of and one of them is Bladerunner!  How interesting we had the same impression! I think for me the music of Bladerunner is haunting, with a dissonant longing quality to it. The music of Tiger Raid echoes that feel. ........................

Btw, the music is the only thing I liked about Bladerunner.  


-- Edited by whimsyfox on Tuesday 25th of October 2016 01:39:28 AM


 That's a good description of the music, Whimsy.  

I also never really liked Bladerunner, which is odd since it's sci-fi and it's one of my boyfriend's favorite movies of all time.  



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